Chemistry Courses

Chemistry Courses

The mission of the Chemistry Department is to develop analytical, critical and imaginative thinking in students, as well as to present concepts, principles and knowledge in the discipline of Chemistry. The department seeks to prepare its majors for graduate study and/or fulfilling careers in chemistry and related areas using their knowledge and understanding of chemistry.

The Chemistry Department serves three distinct constituencies:

  • Chemistry majors
  • Students who take two or more semesters of courses to satisfy the requirements of another major
  • Students who take one course as part of liberal arts requirement

The three groups of students share common goals of:

  • Understanding the atomic and molecular nature of matter and chemical reactions.
  • Applying that understanding by asking and answering questions using the scientifi c method. The breadth and depth of that understanding is dependent on the extent of exposure to the discipline of Chemistry.

Chemistry major: CHM 151, 155, 153, 157, 361, 365, 363, 367, 371, 384, 386, CHM/BIO 404, CHM 481, 483 and any ONE additional 3 or 4-hour upper division chemistry courses (other than CHM 374); MTH 150, 160, 210; PHY 211 and 213.

Chemistry minor: CHM 151, 155, 153, 157, 361, 365, 363, 367, 371 and any one additional 3- or 4-hour upper division chemistry course.

7-12 Chemistry Subject Endorsement
In addition to Professional Education Requirements (see Teacher Education) and the Science Endorsement Core Courses (BIO 101, 102, 103, 105, 107, CHEM 151, 153, 155, 157, PHY 201 or 211, SCI 203 or 223, and SCI 420). Students take: CHM 361, 363, 365, 367 and an additional eight hours of upper division chemistry courses (BIO 404 may be counted).

Chemistry Class List

CHM 100 General Chemistry 3-4 hours
This is an elective course designed for students who transfer in coursework from credit programs where exact course equivalent is not identified in the departmental listings.

CHM 111 General, Organic and Biological Chemistry I — 4 hours
A survey of general chemistry. Molecular and ionic compounds and their chemical reactions are studied. Quantitative relationships, states of matter, solutions and acid-base chemistry will be covered. Three lectures and one laboratory session. Fall semester.    

CHM 113 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry II — 3 hours
A survey of organic compounds and their reactions will prepare for an introduction to the chemical and physical properties of lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, and nucleic acids. Biochemical energetics and the metabolism of these biochemical compounds are studied. Three lectures weekly. CHM 117 lab is optional. Prerequisite: CHM 111 or CHM 151 or permission of instructor. Spring semester.    

CHM 117 General, Organic and Biological Chemistry II Laboratory — 1 hour
Optional laboratory when enrolled in CHM 113.

CHM 151 College Chemistry I — 3 hours
Discussion of the structure of matter, formulas, chemical equations, stoichiometry, periodic law, introductory thermodynamics, atomic structure and chemical bonding, and properties of selected elements. Three lectures, and CHM 155 required. Prerequisites: Two years high school math (required), one year of high school chemistry or CHM 111 or permission of instructor. Fall semester.    

CHM 153 College Chemistry II — 3 hours
A continuation of CHM 151. Continuation of chemical bonding and structure, behavior of gases, solids and liquids, kinetics and equilibrium, solution chemistry, acids and bases, solubility, electrochemistry, introduction to classical quantitative methods of analysis. CHM 157 required. Prerequisite: C or better in CHM 151 or permission of instructor. Spring semester.    

CHM 155 College Chemistry I Laboratory — 1 hour
Required laboratory when enrolled in CHM 151.    

CHM 157 College Chemistry II Laboratory — 1 hour
Required laboratory when enrolled in CHM 153.    

CHM 320 Chemistry Research Experience — 3 hours
This course will place students in a research laboratory. Students will conduct research with graduate students, postdocs, faculty members, or other research scientists. This course is modeled after the summer undergraduate research programs in chemistry found at many research institutions. Prerequisite: CHM 153. January Term.    

CHM 361 Organic Chemistry I — 3 hours
Atomic and molecular structural theory and basic chemical principles are utilized to explain the reactions of simple organic functional groups. The effect of the three-dimensional structure of organic molecules on the products of organic reactions will be considered. The basic principles of spectroscopy (IR, NMR, Mass Spec) are introduced. Three lectures and CHM 365 required. Prerequisite: C or better in CHM 153 (or equivalent course) or permission of instructor. Fall semester.    

CHM 363 Organic Chemistry II — 3 hours
The principles studied in CHM 261 are applied to other functional groups including aromatics, acids, ketones, aldehydes,and acid derivatives. IR, NMR and mass spectroscopy will be used for structural analysis. Th ree lectures and CHM 367 required. Prerequisite: C or better in CHM 361 or permission of instructor. Spring semester.

CHM 365 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory — 1 hour
Required laboratory when enrolled in CHM 361.    

CHM 367 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory — 1 hour
Required laboratory when enrolled in CHM 363.    

CHM 371 Analytical Chemistry — 4 hours
Theory and practice of analytical chemistry including application of chemical equilibrium in acid-base, complexometric, potentiometric, spectrophotometric, and chromatographic determinations. Laboratory experiments emphasize volumetric methods and the instrumental methods of spectrophotometry, potentiometry, and chromatography. Three lectures, one laboratory. Prerequisite: CHM 153. Spring, even-numbered years.    

CHM 374 Bio-Analytical Chemistry — 4 hours
This course will combine aspects of biochemistry, analytical chemistry, and physical chemistry, and will cover selected aspects of thermodynamics and kinetics. Spectrophotometric and other biochemical analytical and instrumental techniques will be discussed and employed in the laboratory. Three lectures and one laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: BIO/CHM 405 or concurrent enrollment in BIO/CHM 405. Spring, even-numbered years.    

CHM 384 Physical Chemistry I — 4 hours
A study of equilibrium and change which constitute macroscopic properties of matter and the changes that occur in physical and chemical systems. This also includes properties of gases, equations of state, laws of thermodynamics, and the behavior of pure systems and mixtures at equilibrium. Three lectures and one laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: CHM 153, MTH 160, PHY 211 (may be concurrent). Fall, even-numbered years.    

CHM 386 Physical Chemistry II — 4 hours
A study of structure, which constitutes quantum mechanics. This includes the description of atomic and simple molecular structure, and spectroscopy. Statistical thermodynamics, which constitute the explanation of thermodynamic properties from molecular properties and transport properties. Three lectures and one laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: CHM 384. Spring, oddnumbered years.    

CHM 404 Biochemistry I (also BIO 404) — 4 hours
The first half of a two-semester biochemistry sequence, this course will examine basic principles of biochemistry, including structures and functions of biological molecules and basic aspects of enzyme kinetics and energy metabolism. Three lectures and one laboratory weekly. Fall semester.    

CHM 405 Biochemistry II (also BIO 405) — 4 hours
An extension of BIO/CHM 404, this class will focus on metabolism and metabolic pathways, including detailed examination of enzyme kinetics, metabolic regulation, and biochemical aspects of gene function and regulation. The laboratory for this course will consist primarily of long-term, problem-based research investigations. Th ree lectures and one laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: BIO/CHM 404. Spring semester.    

CHM 420 Chemistry Research Experience II — 3 hours
This course is designed to be a second chemistry research experience. This course will place students in a research laboratory. Students will conduct research with graduate students, post-docs, faculty members, or other research scientists. This course is modeled after the summer undergraduate research programs in chemistry found at many research institutions. Prerequisite: CHM 320. January Term.

CHM 424 Inorganic Chemistry — 3 hours
A systematic development of the concepts of modern inorganic chemistry with emphasis on the descriptive chemistry of the elements, atomic and molecular structure, the nature of the chemical bond and the principles governing chemical behavior. The laboratory work will include the preparation and characterization of inorganic compounds such as coordination compounds and transition metal organometallic compounds. Three lectures one lab weekly required. Prerequisite: CHM 153. As needed.    

CHM 472 Instrumental Methods — 3 hours
The qualitative and quantitative spectroscopic methods of analysis. Optical and magnetic methods (primarily FT-IR, NMR, MS) will be emphasized for the structural determination of organic compounds. A combined lecture and laboratory format will give theory and experience in modern methods. Prerequisite: CHM 153. As needed.    

CHM 481 Senior Project/Seminar I — 2 hours
Students work on an approved research project in chemistry. The course will include database searching of the chemical literature, the development of a journal-style written report and a professional oral presentation. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Fall semester.    

CHM 483 Senior Project/Seminar II — 2 hours
This course continues the development of a written paper and formal presentation of the student’s research project. Must be taken after CHM 481. Spring semester.